Health trainers provide support to those who want to make lifestyle changes whether it is building confidence and feeling better about themselves or leading a healthy lifestyle to reduce the risk of health issues

These are the official guidelines, but we know following them is easier said than done for many people and even if we do manage to follow them – we are not always perfect and it can still be a struggle! – this is why Health Trainers are here, to support you to be able to live the healthiest lifestyle possible.

 

Healthy Eating

Health trainers provide support to those who want to make lifestyle changes whether it is building confidence and feeling better about themselves or leading a healthy lifestyle to reduce the risk of health issues.

A healthy lifestyle can be achieved by eating a balanced diet, being physically active, maintaining a healthy weight, giving up smoking and drinking alcohol sensibly.

 

Physical activity guidelines – for children, adults and older people

  • Under-fives: 180 minutes - three hours - each day, once a child is able to walk.
  • Children and young people (5-18 year olds): 60 minutes and up to several hours every day of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity. Three days a week should include vigorous intensity activities that strengthen muscle and bone.
  • Adults (19-64 years old) and older people (65+): 150mins - two and half hours - each week of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (and adults should aim to do some physical activity every day). Muscle strengthening activity should also be included twice a week.
 

Eatwell Guide

 

 

Alcohol

 

The government have produced new alcohol guidelines based on new evidence warning that any level of alcohol consumption increases the risk of a range of cancers.

New guidelines are as follows:

  • You are safest not to drink regularly more than 14 units per week, to keep health risks from drinking alcohol to a low level.
  • If you do drink as much as 14 units per week, it is best to spread this evenly over 3 days or more. If you have one or two heavy drinking sessions, you increase your risks of death from long term illnesses and from accidents and injuries.
  • The risk of developing a range of illnesses (including, for example, cancers of the mouth, throat and breast) increases with any amount you drink on a regular basis.
  • If you wish to cut down the amount you’re drinking, a good way to help achieve this is to have several drink-free days each week.

For more information:



 

Mental health

 

Mental illness can affect many areas of a person’s life.  One in four of us will have problems with our mental health at some point in our lives. Finding out more information and getting the right help is essential in managing mental health.

For more information: